The beauty of language

How quite fascinating the english language is. Were I to say that I merely wish to be human, it would mean slightly different from saying that I wish merely to be human. The former places the emphasis on my desire rather than the desire. That very desire within me, to be granted something not at all unreasonable or unattainable, thus forms the pinnacle of the statement. The latter, however, places the emphasis on the desire rather than my desire. The issue here is not so much contained in the reasonableness of my desire as it is in the ordinariness of that which I desire; that is, to be human is elementary.

To afford a greater sense of parallelism to all this: the former implies that since the desire to be human is elementary and not unreasonable, I should not forbid myself from wishing such, while the latter implies that since to be human is elementary and not unreasonable, I should not forbid myself from wishing such.

There are undoubtedly a myriad other examples whereby a small, seemingly inconsequential rearrangement of words effects a disproportionately more significant change in meaning and intention. Such subtleties do indeed form the true, often overlooked beauty of language.

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